Category Archives: Citation analysis

2019 Urban Planning Faculty Citation Results

The following summarizes citation activity and H-Index levels for faculty in urban planning programs in the U.S. and Canada. This includes 293 assistant professors, 359 associate professors, and 450 full professors. Background on urban planning and citation analysis can be … Continue reading

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Comparing Urban Planning Program Citation Levels

Using citation totals or averages for groups of scholars, especially academic programs, tends to favor larger and/or older faculties. A simple way to normalize program totals is factoring the number of total years of faculty experience for each (estimated by … Continue reading

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The Most Frequently Cited Topics in Planning Scholarship

Methods The first step in this analysis was to collect publication records for urban planning academics. Current planning academics with Google Scholar Citation Profiles were used as the source of these data. The suitability of Google Scholar Citations (GS) data … Continue reading

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Citations by Rank, Clearly a Difference

Using the most recent data for urban planning scholars (end of 2018), we see a distinct difference in citation totals between assistant, associate, and full professors. This comes as no surprise and I’ve previously reported on it but just wanted … Continue reading

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2018 Urban Planning Citation Update

The most recent citation data for urban planning faculty are now available at: http://scholarmetrics.com/metrics This includes 1,111 U.S. and Canadian planning faculty, of which 626 have Google Scholar Citation Profiles. Data from profiles are used when available, otherwise counts for … Continue reading

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Yes, h-index and total citations are highly correlated (in case you were wondering)

Data from over 1,100 urban planning academics in the U.S. and Canada show a strong correlation between the h-index and total (career) citations. These vary by rank as shown in my early post analyzing citation levels for all planning faculty … Continue reading

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By the Numbers: Urban Planning Faculty and Program Citations

For the past 7 years I have been tracking citations for urban planning faculty. I started with the U.S. and then added Canadian planning schools. Initially these were all done manually by searching Google Scholar with Publish or Perish and … Continue reading

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Normalizing Citation Counts (Part 2)

I received several insightful comments about my previous post on normalizing citation counts. Several people also suggested that because I calculated these indices at the individual level, that it would be interesting to see the results at the program level. Below … Continue reading

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Normalizing Citation Counts

Higher total citation counts are obviously biased toward more senior faculty who have had more time to publish and be cited. To account for this a variety of metrics have been developed to adjust for career length, output, and other … Continue reading

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Citation Activity of Urban Planning Assistant Professors

Occasionally I am asked how the citation rankings for planning programs take into account the age and rank distribution of planning programs (see most recent analysis: http://tomwsanchez.com/2018-urban-planning-faculty-citation-analysis/). They do not. Younger faculties have fewer overall citations compared to older faculties. For … Continue reading

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